Dog Diet: 7 Foods to never feed your dog

As we all know it can be terribly tempting to feed your pup some leftovers or a nibble of your favourite snack from time to time, I mean who can resist those adorable puppy dog eyes! But not all snacks can be good for your pup so here is a list of 7 foods never to feed your dog so that you can be the best doggy parent ever.

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Chocolate

Let’s start with the most commonly known, chocolate. Chocolate contains a chemical known as theobromine which can cause a serious upset stomach and in larger doses, found in darker chocolates and baking chocolate, can be fatal. So save the sweet treats for yourself.

Grapes & Raisins

Another commonly known food is grapes and raisins. Unfortunately these foods can cause acute kidney failure in your pup. Even if your pup has eaten them before and experienced no side effects, this doesn’t mean that if they consume them again they will not become seriously ill, so it is best to keep them well out of reach.

Cheese

I’m sure all of us have innocently slipped our dog a slither of cheese once in a while, but surprisingly dairy products can cause a very unpleasant experience for your pup. Dogs lack the enzyme to break down milk sugar and many dogs are actually lactose intolerant, so it’s best to save the cheese and the ice cream to yourself for safe keeping!

Garlic & Onions

Next we have garlic and onions. Large doses and regular small doses of these can not only cause terribly smelly breath for us, but can also be poisonous for your pup as they actually destroy your pup’s red blood cells.

Raw Food

Raw diets have become very popular and have many benefits for your dog. However some raw meat, fish and eggs can actually be pretty harmful to your pup. Canines can become ill from salmonella and e. Coli infections, so it is important that if you are thinking of switching to the raw diet you learn the proper preparation and handling of raw meat in order to lower the risk of bacterial or parasitic infection.

Artificial Sweeteners

Another toxic food to avoid is artificial sweeteners, also known as xylitol. This is used in many products such as chewing gum, baked goods, toothpaste, sweets and some brands of peanut butter (so always check the label). Unfortunately, if your pup digests one of these then they can go into hypoglycemia, which is linked to liver failure. 

Salty snacks

One to look out for is salt and salty snacks, although you may not think sharing a bit of your salted popcorn can be harmful, in large doses salt can cause extreme thirst and urination. Extreme thirst can lead to your pup drinking lots of water causing them to bloat and this can be fatal. As well as this, too much salt intake can even cause sodium ion poisoning, so in the best interests of your pup I would recommend avoiding any salty snacks, such as those yummy crisps.

If your dog has consumed any of these foods even in small amounts it’s best to contact your vet for advice to ensure that your pup is safe.

Now that we have discussed the foods you shouldn’t feed your pup, here’s a recipe for a delicious snack that you can feed your pup to keep those puppy dog eyes at bay!

Liver Cake Treats

Liver Cake Treats

I love liver.  Although many people will go 'yuck' at the thought. Liver is a brilliant, nutrient-rich food that most dogs absolutely love.  Liver will provide your pet with proteins, fat and vitamin A,  key nutrients that will help your dog stay healthy. Liver is also a good source of iron, copper, niacin, zinc, and phosphorus. Did you know, liver contains ten times more nutrients than muscle meat! So get cooking these delicious doggy treats.

Ingredients

  • 225g Liver or Lamb's heart or kidney
  • 100g Sweet potato or wheat free flour
  • 2 Eggs

Instructions

    1. Pre-heat oven to 190C (170C fan oven)
    2. Put all ingredients in a food mixer or blender and blitz together.
    3. Pour into a lined cake tin. I found a square tin makes it easier to cut the cake into chunks when cooked.
    4. Cook for 30/40 min. The cake should feel firm to touch.
    5. Allow to cool fully and cut into small cubes.
    6. Freeze when cold.

Notes

Take a few cubes out at a time for treats or training and they take approx 1hr to defrost.
I like to freeze them in small portions in separate bags so I can just pick one up take on a walk.

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